What I read in March

Well, I don’t know about you but March turned into one big blur. The time change hit me hard this time for some reason and I am just now getting normal again. Sheesh. Jeffy’s mom was visiting for a while and I had a book that I just wasn’t into all that much, so I didn’t read a ton this month. I am still ahead on my Goodread’s goal though, so that works for me. 🙂 Here is what I read in March!

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A Paper Son by Jason Buchholz – “Grade school teacher and aspiring author Peregrine Long sees a Chinese family on board a ship–in his morning tea. The image inspires him to write the story of this family, but then a woman turns up at his door, claiming that he’s writing her family history exactly as it happened. She doesn’t like it, but she has one question: What happened to the little boy of the family, her long-lost uncle? Throughout the course of a month-long tempest that begins to wash the peninsula out from beneath them, Peregrine searches modern-day San Francisco and its surroundings–and, through his continued writing, southern China and the Pacific immigration experience of a century ago–for the missing boy. The clues uncovered lead Peregrine to question not only the nature of his writing, but also his knowledge of his own past and his understanding of his identity”.

What I thought: This took me a little bit to get into. I wasn’t sure where it was heading or what the idea was. But once I got it, I loved it. It was a great book, different than most books I have read. I found it fascinating actually, the history and such that was woven throughout the story and how they went about it..

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Fire & Flood by Victoria Scott – What would you do to save someone you love?

Time is slipping away. . . .

Tella Holloway is losing it. Her brother is sick, and when a dozen doctors can’t determine what’s wrong, her parents decide to move to the middle of nowhere for the fresh air. She’s lost her friends, her parents are driving her crazy, her brother is dying–and she’s helpless to change anything.

Until she receives mysterious instructions on how to become a Contender in the Brimstone Bleed. It’s an epic race across jungle, desert, ocean, and mountain that could win her the prize she desperately desires: the Cure for her brother’s illness. But all the Contenders are after the Cure for people they love, and there’s no guarantee that Tella (or any of them) will survive the race.

The jungle is terrifying, the clock is ticking, and Tella knows she can’t trust the allies she makes. And one big question emerges: Why have so many fallen sick in the first place?

Victoria Scott’s breathtaking novel grabs readers by the throat and doesn’t let go.

What I thought: I actually liked this book! It’s a little Hunger Game’ish, but different. I really enjoy the authors voice as this book I read out loud to the kids and it just reads nicely like that.

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Looking For Lovely by Annie F. Downs – “I want you to take every step of your life with excitement for where you are headed. And I want you to feel beautiful and confident as you do.”

But how? When the enemy whispers lies that we are not smart enough, pretty enough, or rich enough? Or are you too dumb, too loud, too quiet, too thin, too fat, too much or not enough? What if you don’t have what it takes to be who you really want to be?”

In Looking for Lovely, Annie F. Downs shares personal stories, biblical truth, and examples of how others have courageously walked the path God paved for their lives by remembering all God had done, loving what was right in front of them, and seeing God in the everyday—whether that be nature, friends, or the face they see in the mirror.

Intensely personal, yet incredibly powerful, Looking for Lovely will spark transformative conversations and life changing patterns. No matter who you are and what path God has you on, we all need to remember the lovely, fight to finish, and find beautiful in our every day!

What I thought: I am going to do a separate blog post on this book…but I really enjoyed this one too!

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One by Sarah Crossan – Grace and Tippi. Tippi and Grace. Two sisters. Two hearts. Two dreams. Two lives. But one body.

Grace and Tippi are conjoined twins, joined at the waist, defying the odds of survival for sixteen years. They share everything, and they are everything to each other. They would never imagine being apart. For them, that would be the real tragedy.

But something is happening to them. Something they hoped would never happen. And Grace doesn’t want to admit it. Not even to Tippi.

How long can they hide from the truth—how long before they must face the most impossible choice of their lives?

What I thought: Well, it seems like I have been drawn to stories about twins the last year or so…ha! But this was conjoined twins. Different! I enjoyed the characters and the way the story was told. It was a good quick read.

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You Too Can Have A Body Like Mine by Alexandra Kleeman – A woman known only as A lives in an unnamed American city with her roommate, B, and boyfriend, C, who wants her to join him on a reality dating show called That’s My Partner! A eats mostly popsicles and oranges, watches endless amounts of television, often just for the commercials— particularly the recurring cartoon escapades of Kandy Kat, the mascot for an entirely chemical dessert—and models herself on a standard of beauty that exists only in such advertising. She fixates on the fifteen minutes of fame a local celebrity named Michael has earned after buying up a Wally’s Supermarket’s entire, and increasingly ample, supply of veal.

Meanwhile, B is attempting to make herself a twin of A, who in turn hungers for something to give meaning to her life, something aside from C’s pornography addiction. Maybe something like what’s gotten into her neighbors across the street, the family who’s begun “ghosting” themselves beneath white sheets and whose garage door features a strange scrawl of graffiti: he who sits next to me, may we eat as one.

An intelligent and madly entertaining novel reminiscent of The Crying of Lot 49, White Noise, and City of Glass, Alexandra Kleeman’s unforgettable debut is a missing-person mystery told from the point of view of the missing person; an American horror story that concerns sex and friendship, consumption and appetite, faith and transformation, real food and reality television; and, above all, a wholly singular vision of modern womanhood by a frightening, “stunning” (Conjunctions), and often very funny voice of a new generation.

What I thought: This book was a great big question mark for me. I didn’t get it. There was no point of the story for me. But I finished it. Blah.

So, that’s what I read in March. I was so happy to start another book after that last book, lol. Let me know some of your favorites, as usual, so I can look for them at my library! 🙂

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